Jesus Was The One Yelling At LDS General Conference

Easter is a time when most Christians tend to focus on Christ’s crucifixion and resurrection. However, I feel spurred to briefly discuss Christ’s life due to an incident that happened Saturday at the LDS Church’s General Conference meeting in Salt Lake City. During the conference’s afternoon session, Crystal Legionaires shouted from the audience “Stop protecting sexual predators!” – a reference to the ongoing scandal of abuse and cover-up currently rankling the mainstream Mormon religion.

Reaction to the outburst has been mixed. There are those who believe it was needed and those who believe it was disrespectful. I find it to be a great opportunity to talk a bit more about Christ – maybe even a fateful one considering it happened on Easter weekend. The incident exemplifies one of Christ’s personality traits: unabashed activism. Below are three ways Christ was an outspoken critic of the status quo and a harbinger of change.

Jesus called out leaders for hypocrisy

Jesus was not a fan of the Pharisees – the religious and political leaders during His time. On several occasions Jesus publicly rebuked them for their hypocrisy and immorality. He lists eight woes of the Pharisees in Matthew 23 – among them:

  • They made a show of praying and worshiping instead of carrying out these tasks quietly and humbly. (Matthew 23:13-14)
  • They taught that temple oaths weren’t binding unless sworn by gold – essentially placing gold higher than God. (Matthew 23:16-22)
  • They adhered to the letter of the law rather than the spirit of the law. (Matthew 23:23-24)
  • They were critical of others’ misdeeds but didn’t keep their own house in order. (Matthew 23:25-26)
  • They portrayed themselves as righteous but inside harbored wicked thoughts. (Matthew 23:27-28)
  • They spoke of dead persecuted prophets in high regard, but were persecutors of the righteous themselves. (Matthew 23:29)

Jesus got angry and even violent

One of the more interesting stories in Jesus’ life tells of a time He traveled to Jerusalem for Passover. When He arrived at the temple He found people selling animals and exchanging money on the temple grounds. In a fit of rage, Jesus overturns tables and whips the money-changers and animals, driving them both from the temple like a shepherd herding livestock, yelling at them not to turn His Father’s holy house into a place of business.

Jesus dirtied his own hands to help those in need

Jesus was a very strong advocate for the poor and disenfranchised. Throughout the New Testament, He is constantly calling on those with more to give to those with less. He regularly mingled with lepers, prostitutes, and all manner of disenfranchised people. His form of ministering meant interacting regularly with those who needed Him most – not giving lectures from behind a pulpit.

The radical Savior

On Easter, a day set aside for us to reflect on the ultimate sacrifice Jesus made, I hope we can think more on how to exemplify the radical kindness He embodied. I believe, whether by merely following Christ’s example or by being pushed by the Holy Spirit, Crystal was doing just that. She was giving a voice to the voiceless and calling out our religious leaders for their tone-deaf response in the face of an unfolding crisis.

Victims of sexual abuse by church leaders have been trying for years through traditional means to have their voices heard and changes made. But so far, LDS prophets and apostles have been uninterested in coming down from the pulpit and mingling with the disenfranchised.

In the face of this silence, with traditional avenues exhausted, increasingly radical steps become necessary. Protests and civil disobedience have long been the drivers of change throughout history. As more drastic actions like Crystal’s are taken, I hope those watching will remember that whipping people and overturning tables is not out of the realm of possibility when answering the question “What would Jesus do?”. Instead of offering condemnation, perhaps it’s time to start listening.

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